Save 5% For Your First Order. Discount Code: SUM5

Collection: Bike Tire Pump

Electric Bike Space has been providing the best bike tire pumps to riders for years. We are a one-stop solution to all the people looking out for the best bike accessories. Here you can find the best bike tire pump. We strive to provide 100 percent satisfaction to our customers. Your confidence in us means a lot to us.

Buy your bike tire pump from Electric Bike Space NOW!

6 products
  • Bike Tire Pump GS02D
    Regular price
    $56.00
    Sale price
    $56.00
    Regular price
    $56.00
    Unit price
    per 
    Sold out
  • Bike Tire Pump VM18
    Regular price
    $62.49
    Sale price
    $62.49
    Regular price
    $62.49
    Unit price
    per 
    Sold out
  • Smart Bike Tire Pump BP198
    Regular price
    $66.99
    Sale price
    $66.99
    Regular price
    $66.99
    Unit price
    per 
    Sold out
  • Smart Air Pump V103
    Regular price
    $59.00
    Sale price
    $59.00
    Regular price
    $59.00
    Unit price
    per 
    Sold out
  • Bike Pump GM-641
    Regular price
    $44.00
    Sale price
    $44.00
    Regular price
    $44.00
    Unit price
    per 
    Sold out
  • Bike Pump YS-033T
    Regular price
    $28.00
    Sale price
    $28.00
    Regular price
    $28.00
    Unit price
    per 
    Sold out

Buy best tire pumps from Electric Bike Space

A bike pump can be a lifesaver if you get a flat tire while out on a ride. A bike pump is a handy tool if you get a flat tire while out on a ride. There are many different types of pumps, so be sure to choose one compatible with your bike.

Mini-pumps are portable. A rider must always be carrying it in his/her frame bag. if your tire punctures, it helps you fix your deflated tire. It provides enough air to get you back to home. Thus, it gives a rider enough security and confidence.

Although it may seem simple, every cyclist needs to know how to pump their bike's tires.

Many of you probably already know how to do this, but for those who don't, the different valve types, pumps, and, most importantly, how hard to pump your tire can be confusing. Let us help you get through it.

This post will discuss things you need to know about bike tire pumps, how to pump a bike tire, bike tire pressure, and Bike tire pump types.

Bike Tire Pump Types

You need to know what valves your bike has and how they work if you want to pump your tires or buy inner tubes.

There are three types of bike tire pumps: Schrader, Presta, and Woods. Out of these three, Schrader and Presta have tubeless valves. These three bike tire valves are easily distinguished by their distinct features.

Here are the bike tire pump types you need to know:

  1. Schrader

The Schrader valve is easy to use and is in all cars and bikes with larger tires. You push the head of the pump on the valve most of the time, lock it perfectly with a lever (whose job is to push down on the middle stalk), and then pump. The middle stalk pushes back up when the pump head is taken off, shutting off the valve. Removable cores are available in all Shrader valves.

The Schrader valve isn't as good as a Presta because it needs an 8mm rim’s hole instead of a 6mm hole. Since majority of all road bikes have narrow rims, this means that there isn't adequate metal remain around the hole to make the rim strong enough.

Features of the Schrader Valve

 

● Schrader Valve Stem: Uses inner threading to hold the core of the valve inside. Close to the top of the valve is an outer thread where both the valve’s stem cap and bike’s pump hoses are screwed on.

● Schrader Valve Core: A spring-loaded pin in the middle of the core controls how much air is taken in and released from the valve.

 

  1. Presta

Presta is a valve kind that lets you control how much air is taken in and released from a bicycle's inner tube. They are long and thin, and most modern bikes have them.

Frenchman Etienne Sclaverand came up with the idea. People often call Presta valves "French valves," which is a good name for them.

We don't know when the Presta valve was invented, but we think it was 1880 and above.

Presta bike valves are light and come in different lengths to fit road bikes, which usually have wheels that possess deep-section rims.

The thin valve stem of a Presta valve makes a wheel stronger because it only needs a small rim’s hole. Most bicycles nowadays have Presta valves.

Because they have a thin stem, including a valve mechanism that is partly outside the valve, Presta valves are weaker and cost a little more than its competitors.

Features of Presta Valve

● Presta Valve Stem: This part holds the valve core and has threading on the inside. Because the stem is threaded on the outside, rim nuts can be used.

● Presta Valve Core: The valve core nut above the valve core opens and closes the valve.

● Presta Valve Rim Nut: Keeps the valve from getting to the rim while the pump is attached and the tire is inflated. It can be left on or taken off once the tire is inflated.

 

  1. Woods or Dunlop Valves

Even though it is less common than Presta and Shrader, it is still common on Dutch bikes. It has a broad valve stem and needs a Presta pump to fill up. You just have to press it forward; no knurled top nut is needed to take off. The easy-to-remove valve core is held in place by this large knurled ring.

The old Dunlop valve used a tight rubber sleeve to control airflow. The new Dunlop valve is more convenient to use and keeps in good shape.

This rubber sleeve usually breaks down over time, requiring more care to keep working right.

The core of a Dunlop valve can be taken out without any unique apparatus, which is different from Schrader and Presta valves. Dunlop valves are more common in the developing world because they are easy to take care of and have strong stems.

The stem of a Woods valve is about the same size as that of a Schrader valve. To pump it up, you need a Presta pump or a bike tire valve adapter.

Features of Wood Valves

● Dunlop Valve Stem: The valve core remains within the valve stem, and the nut at the top screws onto the exterior threading to hold it in place. Because the stems are threaded externally, you can also use a rim nut.

● Dunlop Valve Core: Lets valve accommodate air but doesn't have a core pin in the middle, so it has to be taken off to reduce pressure. It's held in place by the top nut on the stem.

● Dunlop Valve Rim Nut: The top nut on the Dunlop Valve Rim Nut keeps the stem of the valve from going into the rim when the tire is blown with air. It can't be taken off once the tire is inflated.

 

Presta and Schrader Valves: What Are Their Differences?

Although both Schrader and Presta valves work similarly, they are more different than they are alike.

Firstly, Presta is different from Schrader in that it has more parts:

● Valve core

● Locknut

● Valve lockring

 

Modern Presta valves have a valve core that can be taken out and changed whenever your tire begins to lose air, and also if you get sealant on the core each time you put it in.

The valve lockring is located at the exterior of the valve and screws down to hold the valve on the rim and keep it from going high and low.

The locknut is located at the top of the valve and keeps the core of the valve from falling apart. You have to take it apart to pump air or change the core.

Schrader valves, however, are pretty much easier to use than Presta. Shrader valves are fashioned from an outer shell and a removable core that has a check valve of a spring-loaded design, and above is a rubber/plastic cap.

Schrader vs. Presta – Which One to Choose?

Since Presta valves are for bicycles, there are several reasons behind opting for them over Schrader. Firstly, they are smaller, so the rim’s hole needs to be smaller. So, they have less of an effect on the rim's structure compared to Schrader valves.

Because the air pressure itself seals them tightly, they can withstand more pressure and be more reliable. They are lighter and reduce the wheel's rolling resistance because they don't possess any mechanical check valve like Schrader.

Adapters make it easy to make Presta valves bigger, so you can use the same valve or inner tube on various kinds of rim. This is helpful when changing to aero rims with a deep section.

 

Bike Tire Pressure

Having the right PSI (pounds per square inch) in your bike tires can make a huge difference. But it's an exaggeration to say that less air makes the ride more comfortable, and more air makes you go faster. Even though this is true a lot of the time, the truth is that the best inflation for a rider and his or her bike depends on the rider and the bike.

The recommended psi is written on the side of every tire, close to where it meets the rim. This is usually written as a range, like "90 to 115 psi," because there are times when you might want to be on a high or low end. We'll talk more about this in a bit.

If your tires don't show a recommended pressure, a good rule of thumb is to pump them up until they are firm but can still be slightly squeezed. There are also generally accepted ranges based on the type of bike:

Bike Tire Type

PSI range

Road bikes (narrow tires)

80-130 PSI

Hybrid bikes (medium tires)

80-70 PSI

Mountain bikes (thick tires)

30-50 PSI

 

 

How To Pump a Bike Tire

Putting air in your bike tires is easy and quick as long as you have the right tools. Use the methods below to figure out what kind of valve you have and pump accordingly.

  1. Schrader Valve

 

● Find out how much PSI your tires should have. This will be written as a range in raised letters on the side of your bike tire. The recommended maximum PSI is the high number. Don't let your PSI go below the low number.

● If your bicycle pump has two holes, the larger hole goes with the Schrader valve. Smart pumps that have only an opening will change themselves automatically to cover up a Schrader valve.

● Take off the rubber cap above the valve and put it somewhere safe, like your back pocket. You shouldn't lose it. Place the pump on top of the valve. Whenever there's a lever close to the nozzle, ensure that it's in the open level (in parallel position to the nozzle) each time you apply it on the valve. When it's active, move the lever downward into the closed position (perpendicular to the nozzle). As you pump, observe the PSI.

● Flip the lever back up and then quickly put the rubber cap back on the valve to take the pump off.

 

  1. Presta Valve

● Release the valve. Torelease a Presta valve, loosen the dust cap above. Then, unscrew the small brass cap on the valve stem. It won't detach completely, but should be easy to lift. Press on the valve stem to see if the bras cap is loose enough. If you can feel or hear a sharp release of air coming out, you've done enough to loosen it.

● Find out how much PSI your tires should have. This will be written in raised letters beside your bike tire and will be a range. Prevent your PSI from going below the low number. The recommended highest level PSI is a high number.

● Pump up the tire. Remove the dust cap and loosen the smaller brass cap on the Presta valve to open it.

● Set the pump above the valve. If you find a lever close to the nozzle, ensure that it's in the open level (in parallel position to the nozzle) when you put it on the valve. When it's on, move the lever down into the closed position ( in a perpendicular state to the nozzle). As you pump, observe on the PSI.

● Turn the lever back up to take the pump off, and then close the brass cap.

 

Conclusion

Here we have them – the things you need to know about bike tire pumps. We hope the information we shared will help you better understand your bike tire pump.